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Bill Roth, Ulitzer Editor-at-Large

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(Syndicated from Michael Letschin's Blog)

Over the past few weeks, I have been working on a side project with one of the Nexenta partners to prepare for the Intel Developers Forum in San Francisco this week. The partner Cirracore based in Atlanta works with Equinix and Telx pretty heavily and offers a few managed private and public cloud solutions. One of these solutions is based on the Intel Modular Server Chassis(IMS). If you have not checked out this chassis, it is probably one of the most engineered but least publicized piece of hardware I have seen in years. First to give you an Idea of what the chassis is made of, then two solutions we release this week, vCloud in a Box and VDI/SMB in a Box.

The Intel IMS is a 6u chassis that combines 6 server blades, 14 2.5″ drives, and switching. The IMS comes with its own management console, which allows for some really interesting use cases. A small case is that the configuration allows you to group multiple drives, then carve the drives into virtual disks presented to individual or multiple servers. You can also add a secondary JBOD if you need more storage space. The networking is rather rudimentary in the switches, however it does allow for layer 2 VLAN tagging. One thing that has made it harder to work within the inability to change the VLAN of the management port. It is hard coded to VLAN 1.

Now for the solutions. The vCloud in a Box is the first of the two solutions....

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More Stories By Bill Roth

Bill Roth is a Silicon Valley veteran with over 20 years in the industry. He has played numerous product marketing, product management and engineering roles at companies like BEA, Sun, Morgan Stanley, and EBay Enterprise. He was recently named one of the World's 30 Most Influential Cloud Bloggers.