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Bill Roth, Ulitzer Editor-at-Large

Bill Roth

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Latest Articles from Bill Roth
On June 30, IBM and two U.S. senators announced the initial deployment of a system to link local Mississippi law enforcement agencies to a single database of public safety information. The federally funded project will deliver public safety information across Mississippi to the desktop...
IBM and the Apache Foundation announced that IBM is contributing the Cloudscape product it acquired from Informix to the Apache open source program. The project name for the effort will be 'Derby.' The contribution amounts to more than 500,000 lines of Java code. In related news IBM...
Orbitz's CTO Chris Hjelms and Red Hat's CEO Matthew Szulik between them provided an adrenalin injection for the Linux faithful - and food for thought for the naysayers - when they delivered the opening keynote at the LinuxWorld Conference & Expo yesterday here in San Francisco.
While the big market share gainers in 2003 were not IBM and BEA, but Oracle and JBoss, both of which bucked the deflationary trend in the enterprise software market, BEA has been pointing out in the run-up to LinuxWorld Conference & Expo today that it was named the leader in applicat...
The so-called 'Beehive' and 'Pollinate' projects will be riding the next wave of Open Source innovation, if things go according to plan for BEA's scheme to release the source code for a large portion of its application development framework for WebLogic Workshop.
Democrats are taking full advantage of Linux and open source software (OSS) in their bid to win the White House in 2004. Leveraging the successful e-campaign strategies pioneered by Howard Dean during the primary season, all of the democratic candidates embraced Linux and OSS in some f...
A Mississippi-based project involving IBM and Novell's SUSE LINUX underlines the growing importance of Linux in the government sector. The State of Mississippi Automated System Project (ASP) will provide local officials with real-time access to public safety information including mug s...
Scott McNealy held court yesterday at JavaOne, giving a keynote presentation in which he was more subdued than usual, but which covered every issue from Sun's hardware and software offerings to its position on open source. JDJ editorial board member Bill Roth was there to record his im...
With demo after demo designed to dispel the notion that Java is not performant and a host of announcements concerning everything from the open-sourcing of Java 3D to the new versioning system for the Java platform, Sun's top executives opened the 9th annual JavaOne yesterday with all g...
Linux is taking the world of Java application servers by storm. Recently, Sun Microsystems hosted an event to tout the adoption of the latest version of the enterprise Java platform, known as Java 2 platform, Enterprise Edition, or simply J2EE 1.4. At this event, many of the applicat...
We know from the theory of relativity that the passage of time is relative to the perceiver. This is true of history as well. Sometimes history moves fast, e.g., during World War II and when communism was crumbling in 1989. Sometimes history moves slowly, as in the Cold War and the per...
Linux is making huge gains as the platform of choice for developing and deploying enterprise Java applications. Sun has seen more than 1 million downloads of the Linux version of its latest application server release, and all application server vendors uniformly agree that Linux is a f...
This talk will review the evolution of the J2EE platform, and discuss its future, with an emphasis on crucial issues to be addressed in order to avoid the looming disaster of fragmentation.
JavaOne always provides plenty of food for thought. JavaOne 2003 was no exception. This year, Alan Williamson, our beloved editor-in-chief, organized a 'birds-of-a-feather' session for the JDJ editorial board. This is quite an auspicious bunch, and this session provided an opportunity ...
Back in the beginning of October, I was dragged into the middle of a raging e-mail argument. The argument was whether J2EE was a success, and if it was too complicated. This was like waving a red cape in front of a Spanish bull. I felt then, as I feel now, compelled to respond.